Auction No. 141

Ancient and World Coins (Lots 1-1528)
Live bidding starts: 2nd June 2024, 17:00 CEST

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Greek Coins
KINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’ (336-323 BC). GOLD Stater. Abydos.

Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right; helmet decorated with serpent.
Rev: AΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ.
Nike standing left, holding wreath and stylis. Controls: monogram in left field, scallop-shell below left wing.

Price 1572.

Condition: Very fine.

Weight: 8.56 g.
Diameter: 19 mm.

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Greek Coins
★ Extremely Rare Type ★
IONIA. Uncertain. EL 1/48 Stater (Circa 560-530 BC).

Obv: Head of cockerel right.
Rev: Incuse square.

Unpublished in the standard references; Roma Numismatics E-18, lot 274; Roma Numismatics E-91, lot 409.

Condition: Good very fine.

Weight: 0.35 g.
Diameter: 6 mm.

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Greek Coins
★ Ex Monetarium 1983 ★
IONIA. Ephesos. Tetradrachm (Circa 340-325 BC). Klytios, magistrate.

Obv: Ε – Φ.
Bee.
Rev: KΛYTIOΣ.
Forepart of stag right, head left; palm tree to left.

Künker E-68, lot 108; Solidus 21, lot 150.

Ex Monetarium fixed price list 40 (1983), lot 51

Condition: Very fine.

Weight: 15.15 g.
Diameter: 23 mm.

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Greek Coins
★ Unpublished Type ★
CILICIA. Tarsos. 1/3 Stater (Circa 425-400 BC).

Obv: Forepart of winged and horned lion left.
Rev: Persian King advancing right, holding bow and leaning on staff.

SNG BN – (cf. 208 for obv. type, described as a griffin); cf. SNG Levante 59 (same); SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; BMC -.

The obverse type is described as a griffin in both BN and Levante collections, but the exceptional preservation of this specimen clearly shows lion jaws instead of griffin beak

Condition: Extremely fine.

Weight: 3.72 g.
Diameter: 14 mm.

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Roman Imperial Coins
★ Attractive Tiberius ★
TIBERIUS (14-37). GOLD Aureus. “Tribute Penny” type. Lugdunum.

Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS.
Laureate head right.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM.
Livia (as Pax) seated right on throne, holding sceptre and olive branch.

RIC² 29; Calicó 305a.

The obverse legend calling Tiberius ‘divi filius’, son of God (Augustus), is one of the contradictions of what was considered one of the most controversial princes of ancient Rome. In fact, Tiberius was reluctant to accept the succession, more loyal to republican ideals. When he became emperor, he first of all refused the name ‘Imperator’, which was his by right. He also did not want the prestigious title of ‘Father of the State’ and apparently despised that of ‘Augustus’, which he ended up accepting, however, together with the ‘imperium maius et infinitum’ and the ‘tribunicia potestas’, which were the foundations of the Republic. He also arranged for the cult of the living emperor to be abolished. All these refusals contributed to the misunderstanding of Tiberius by his contemporaries, who were now attached to the Augustan concept of Empire. Tiberius was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero, of noble lineage and republican orientation, and Livia Drusilla. His father had sided first with Julius Caesar, then, upon his assassination, with the Caesaricides, to join the revolt against Octavian and fall back south with Sextus Pompey. In 39 B.C. at Misenum, Nero was forced to divorce his wife to give her to Julius Caesar’s heir, so Tiberius ended up in Augustus’ custody and Livia gained an important political advantage. Tiberius married Vipsania Agrippina, the woman he loved and who bore him a son, Drusus, but was forced by Augustus to divorce and marry his daughter Julia. This was another blow to Tiberius who, disgusted with his new wife and politics, decided to retire to Rhodes, leaving room for Augustus’ chosen heirs, Gaius and Lucius Caesar. The two, however, died (AD 2 and 4) and Augustus ended up associating Tiberius himself with the throne, whom he considered to be competent above all in military matters.

Condition: Very fine.

Weight: 7.74 g.
Diameter: 20 mm.

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Roman Imperial Coins
★ Manlia Scantilla ★
MANLIA SCANTILLA (Augusta,193). Denarius. Rome.

Obv: MANL SCANTILLA AVG.
Draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO REGINA.
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at feet to left, peacock.

RIC 7.

Manlia Scantilla became the wife of Marcus Didius Julianus in 153, and from this marriage a daughter, Didia Clara, was born, with whom she was elected to the rank of augusta by the Roman Senate on the occasion of her husband’s elevation to emperor. According to the historian Herodianus, the two women themselves suggested that Didius buy his imperial office at auction. When her husband was beheaded on 1 June 193, Manlia Scantilla was able to dispose of the body but not the heredity, losing the title of augusta. There are no records after that, and depictions of her and her daughter on coins or statues remain very rare.

Condition: Good very fine.

Weight: 3.18 g.
Diameter: 19 mm.

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Roman Imperial Coins
★ Extremely Rare With Expressive Portrait ★
CONSTANTIUS II (337-361). GOLD Solidus. Siscia.

Obv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG.
Cuirassed bust facing slightly right, wearing crested and diademed helmet, holding spear across shoulder and shield decorated with horseman motief.
Rev: GLORIA REI PVBLICAE / SIS.
Roma enthroned facing right and Constantinopolis enthroned facing left with foot on prow, supporting between them shield inscribed VOT XXX MVLT XXXX in four lines.

RIC 320.

Son of Constantine I ‘the Great,” born in Sirmium, Constantius II became Caesar at age 17 and, upon his father’s death in 337, became Augustus of the East. Constantius was of the Arian faith and organized a synod in Antioch in 341 to promote his own creed in opposition to the Nicene creed defended by his brother and Augustus of the West, Constans I. In 359 he also declared Arianism the state religion. On the death of his brothers, Constantine II (340) and Constans I (350) he became sole emperor and had to face the usurper Magnentius, aided in this by his sister Constantina, who managed to secure for him the strong army of General Vetranio. Thanks to this in the famous battle of Mursa, Constantius succeeded in defeating the usurper who, together with his brother and Augustus of the West Decentius, committed suicide shortly afterwards. He initially (351) appointed as Caesar his cousin Constantius Gallus, who married Constantina. Constantius Gallus was considered by the sources to be an able commander but made himself hated for his despotic ways; he also promoted a pro-poor monetary policy, in contrast to that of Constantine I and Constantius II himself, who favored gold coinage and the wealthy classes. He was thus assassinated by the aristocracy of Antioch and struck with damnatio memoriae. In his place Constantius’ cousin Julian was appointed Caesar. Constantius II is remembered for attempting to bring Rome back to prominence by granting tax privileges to the Church and donating important monuments, giving the impression that he preferred the “Urbe” at the expense of his father’s chosen capital. He was nevertheless forced to return to Constantinople to face the Persians, but was betrayed by Julian, who refused to march to his aid and was acclaimed Augustus by the soldiers in Paris. However, it was illness that overcame him in 361.

Condition: Near extremely fine.

Weight: 4.16 g.
Diameter: 21 mm.

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Roman Imperial Coins
★ Very Rare Solidus ★
JULIAN II APOSTATA (360-363). GOLD Solidus. Arelate.

Obv: FL CL IVLIANVS P P AVG.
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VIRTVS EXERC GALL / KONSTAN.
Soldier standing right, head left, holding trophy and dragging captive to left; to right, eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head left, with wreath in beak.

RIC 303; Depeyrot 10/1.

The reverse of this Solidus glorifies the Gallic army, which proved very attached to Julian, acclaiming him Augustus in 360. Gaul was in fact overlooked by Constantius II and was paying huge taxes. Julian was able to reduce them and win the trust of the soldiers to the tune of military victories. Julian II was born in Constantinople, son of Basilina and Julius Constantius, half-brother of Constantine I ‘the Great’. Because of his young age he was spared in the 337 massacre of Constantine’s family members. His youthful education at the court of Constantius II was in the care of the pagan eunuch Mardonius, marked by the myth of classical culture and paganism, particularly Neoplatonism. Upon the death of Constantius Gallus, Julian took his place as Caesar in 355 and married Constantius II’s sister, Helena, after which he immediately left to fight the Germans who had invaded Colonia Agrippinensium. Here, after a series of fights, he succeeded in winning the favor of the people and the army, who acclaimed him Augustus in 360, raising the ire of Constantius II. Upon the latter’s death Julian became sole emperor and moved back to Constantinople, beginning to deprive the Christian Church of all the rights that had been granted to it by its predecessors, thus earning the appellation “Apostate.” Although he never openly persecuted Christians, his policies undoubtedly favored pagans and Jews. Julian also distinguished himself as a man of culture, writing several works, both satirical and philosophical. His main goal was to get the Romans to return to worshiping the ancient gods, and he thought he would succeed by winning the war against the Persians of Shapur II. After a series of victories the emperor reached the gates of Ctesiphon in June 363, but at that point he hesitated and, instead of attacking the city, decided to wait until he rejoined Procopius’ army. This move proved fatal, for after a hard fight at Maranga on the Tigris, he was wounded and killed at Samarra. Julian was buried at Tarsus, while peace was signed with Shapur II and Jovian, a moderate Christian, was elected new emperor.

Condition: Extremely fine; some luster in field.

Weight: 4.48 g.
Diameter: 22 mm.

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Roman Imperial Coins
VALENS (364-378). GOLD Solidus. Thessalonica.

Obv: D N VALENS P F AVG.
Pearl-diademed bust left, wearing consular robe, holding mappa in right hand and sceptre in left.
Rev: SALVS REIP / (two stars) / SMTES.
Valens standing facing, head right, right foot on bound kneeling captive, holding labarum and Victory on globe.

RIC 3b.2; Depeyrot 31/2.

Very rare. Flavius Julius Valens was the younger brother of Valentinian I. After serving as protector domesticus (personal guard) of Julian II and Jovian, he immediately became emperor of the East in 364 thanks to his brother who was already Augustus of the West, although the two differed in faith. Valens in fact was an Arian, while Valentinian was a Nicene Christian. The first problem was presented by the usurper Procopius, comes of Antioch, who proclaimed himself Augustus of the East in 365. Valens defeated him, sentenced him to death and struck with damnatio memoriae. He later faced the Visigoths and a second conspiracy, hatched by Theodore of Antioch. In 374 Valens celebrated the decennalia and became Maximus Augustus in 375 on the death of his brother, after which he organized an expedition against the Persians that proved unsuccessful, forcing him to sign an unfavorable peace. Another problem was the confluence of Ostrogoths and Visigoths into Roman territory across the Danube because of the advance of the Huns. The Romans were forced to accept them, but this integration was not easy; the Visigoths felt oppressed and exploited as a labor-power, resulting in an insurrection. Valens, considered a general of little ability by his contemporaries, was thus induced to recruit Goth mercenaries, with the risk that they would end up allied with his enemies. In fact, a large contingent of Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Huns, and Alamanni joined forces to fight the Romans and achieved a decisive victory at Hadrianopolis (Thrace) in 378. The tremendous defeat was caused by Gratian, who was meanwhile on the Western throne and did not arrive in time with his troops. Valens died in the battle but the Goths failed to conquer Constantinople. According to Ambrose, bishop of Mediolanum, the defeat at Hadrianopolis heralded the fall of the empire and the end of the world.

Condition: Near extremely fine; some luster in field.

Weight: 4.44 g.
Diameter: 22 mm.

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Roman Imperial Coins
★ Very Rare Reverse Type ★
VALENS (364-378). GOLD Solidus. Constantinople.

Obv: D N VALENS P F AVG.
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VIRTVS ROMANORVM / (palm) CONS (palm).
Valens and Valentinian standing facing, heads turned towards each other, each holding spear and between them Victory standing facing on globe crowning them.

RIC 5b.2; Depeyrot 10/4.

Flavius Julius Valens was the younger brother of Valentinian I. After serving as protector domesticus (personal guard) of Julian II and Jovian, he immediately became emperor of the East in 364 thanks to his brother who was already Augustus of the West, although the two differed in faith. Valens in fact was an Arian, while Valentinian was a Nicene Christian. The first problem was presented by the usurper Procopius, comes of Antioch, who proclaimed himself Augustus of the East in 365. Valens defeated him, sentenced him to death and struck with damnatio memoriae. He later faced the Visigoths and a second conspiracy, hatched by Theodore of Antioch. In 374 Valens celebrated the decennalia and became Maximus Augustus in 375 on the death of his brother, after which he organized an expedition against the Persians that proved unsuccessful, forcing him to sign an unfavorable peace. Another problem was the confluence of Ostrogoths and Visigoths into Roman territory across the Danube because of the advance of the Huns. The Romans were forced to accept them, but this integration was not easy; the Visigoths felt oppressed and exploited as a labor-power, resulting in an insurrection. Valens, considered a general of little ability by his contemporaries, was thus induced to recruit Goth mercenaries, with the risk that they would end up allied with his enemies. In fact, a large contingent of Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Huns, and Alamanni joined forces to fight the Romans and achieved a decisive victory at Hadrianopolis (Thrace) in 378. The tremendous defeat was caused by Gratian, who was meanwhile on the Western throne and did not arrive in time with his troops. Valens died in the battle but the Goths failed to conquer Constantinople. According to Ambrose, bishop of Mediolanum, the defeat at Hadrianopolis heralded the fall of the empire and the end of the world.

Condition: Extremely fine.

Weight: 4.56 g.
Diameter: 21 mm.

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Roman Imperial Coins
VALENS (364-378). GOLD Solidus. Nicomedia.

Obv: D N VALENS P F AVG.
Pearl-diademed bust left, wearing consular robe, holding mappa in right hand and sceptre in left.
Rev: VOTA PVBLICA / S-MN-I.
Valentinian I and Valens enthroned facing, each nimbate and wearing consular robes, holding mappa and sceptre; in exergue, two bound captives vis-à-vis.

RIC 16b.5; Depeyrot 22/2.

Very rare. Flavius Julius Valens was the younger brother of Valentinian I. After serving as protector domesticus (personal guard) of Julian II and Jovian, he immediately became emperor of the East in 364 thanks to his brother who was already Augustus of the West, although the two differed in faith. Valens in fact was an Arian, while Valentinian was a Nicene Christian. The first problem was presented by the usurper Procopius, comes of Antioch, who proclaimed himself Augustus of the East in 365. Valens defeated him, sentenced him to death and struck with damnatio memoriae. He later faced the Visigoths and a second conspiracy, hatched by Theodore of Antioch. In 374 Valens celebrated the decennalia and became Maximus Augustus in 375 on the death of his brother, after which he organized an expedition against the Persians that proved unsuccessful, forcing him to sign an unfavorable peace. Another problem was the confluence of Ostrogoths and Visigoths into Roman territory across the Danube because of the advance of the Huns. The Romans were forced to accept them, but this integration was not easy; the Visigoths felt oppressed and exploited as a labor-power, resulting in an insurrection. Valens, considered a general of little ability by his contemporaries, was thus induced to recruit Goth mercenaries, with the risk that they would end up allied with his enemies. In fact, a large contingent of Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Huns, and Alamanni joined forces to fight the Romans and achieved a decisive victory at Hadrianopolis (Thrace) in 378. The tremendous defeat was caused by Gratian, who was meanwhile on the Western throne and did not arrive in time with his troops. Valens died in the battle but the Goths failed to conquer Constantinople. According to Ambrose, bishop of Mediolanum, the defeat at Hadrianopolis heralded the fall of the empire and the end of the world.
Condition: Extremely fine; smoothed fields.

Weight: 4.65 g.
Diameter: 22 mm.

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Roman Imperial Coins
KINGS OF MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’ (336-323 BC). Drachm. Miletos.

Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔPOY.
Zeus seated left on throne, holding eagle and sceptre. Control: Monogram in left field.

Price 2151.

Condition: Near extremely fine.

Weight: 4.24 g.
Diameter: 18 mm.

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